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Articles about ‘Transport’

October Newsletter

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Welcome to my latest Parliamentary newsletter. This covers local issues and developments as well as my actions in Parliament. As ever, please do not hesitate to get in touch with me on these or any other issues.

Best wishes,

Richard

 

In Birmingham Northfield

Boundary Review

bce-northfield-proposals

The Boundary Commission published their proposals for changes to Parliamentary constituency boundaries in England. Under these proposals, Birmingham would be set to lose one Parliamentary seat overall. There would still be a constituency called Birmingham Northfield, but it would be very different to the current one. Read more

Securing School Transport

Birmingham City Council is planning to remove dedicated transport to and from school for children with special needs. Parents rely on these services to help their children get to school safely and in a mind-set prepared for learning.

Read more

Transport Secretary must come clean about UK’s role in allowing cars to pollute above legal limit

Following the recent VW scandal, EU Member State representatives agreed on 28th October at Technical Committee to tighten EU emissions testing rules – and then appeared to give open-ended permission for cars to breach the EU’s own limits by 50% in real live driving conditions. Read more

Impact of Calais on Kent traffic demands better than short-fixes

It’s not only in politics that a week is a long time. Last week our TV screens were dominated by scenes long queues of stationary lorries stacked up along the M20; of holiday makers stuck in jams; of residents unable to get out of nearby Kent villages and of local businesses losing trade with customers unable to get to them and orders unable to get out. All of them victims of a perfect storm of an industrial dispute closing terminals in Calais and the migrant crisis coinciding with peak holiday travel and an economic recovery boosting cross-channel freight.

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Rise in road casualties highlight impact of cuts in road safety and police budgets

This week  the Government published the annual statistics on reported road casualties in Great Britain.

Behind these figures are personal tragedies for thousands of families up and down the country whose loved ones have been killed or injured on our roads.

They should be a wake-up call for Ministers. After decades of progress, for some time there have been worrying rises in casualty rates for months. The rises in fatalities is particularly serious amongst vulnerable road users like pedestrians (12% increase from last year) and cyclists (4%  up from last year).

As Shadow Roads Minister I have called on Government Minister to get to the bottom of why this is happening, including assessing the impact of cuts in road safety and police budgets. And they should bring back targets for improving road safety so we can both get both incentives and accountability back into the system.